Last edited by Grogrel
Saturday, November 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Early sixteenth century glass beads in the Spanish colonial trade found in the catalog.

Early sixteenth century glass beads in the Spanish colonial trade

Marvin T. Smith

Early sixteenth century glass beads in the Spanish colonial trade

  • 169 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Cottonlandia Museum Publications in Greenwood, Miss .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Peru
    • Subjects:
    • Jones, L. B. -- Art collections.,
    • Avent, Carrie -- Art collections.,
    • Glass beads -- Peru -- History -- 16th century.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 59-64.

      StatementMarvin T. Smith, Mary Elizabeth Good.
      ContributionsGood, Mary Elizabeth.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsNK5440.B34 S62 1982
      The Physical Object
      Paginationx, 64 p. :
      Number of Pages64
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3067188M
      LC Control Number82164480

      18th Century Spanish Colonial Folk Retablo of St. James the Moor-Slayer Price: $1, Was: $1, ʺW × ʺD × ʺH Asheville, NC. Vivid green glass beads surround the eyes. While the color is reminiscent of jade, a material that was highly valued in the Americas, these beads were brought across the Atlantic by Spanish explorers to be used as gifts and for trade. The pink and white beads that dominate the figure's body were drilled from Caribbean shells.


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Early sixteenth century glass beads in the Spanish colonial trade by Marvin T. Smith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Early Sixteenth Century Glass Beads in the Spanish Colonial Trade. Cottonlandia Museum Publications, Unmarked text.

Bumped corner. Very Good. Paperback (Saddle Stitched). (#) (Out of Stock) 9 maps and illustrations. 5 tables. Bibliography. 64p. Topics include the provenance of the beads, manufacture, classifications, and more.

Early Sixteenth Century Glass Beads in the Spanish Colonial Trade Paperback – January 1, by Marvin T. Smith (Author), Mary Elizabeth Good Early sixteenth century glass beads in the Spanish colonial trade book.

Early sixteenth century glass beads in the Spanish Colonial trade by Marvin T. Smith Published by Cottonlandia Museum Publications in : Early Sixteenth Century Glass Beads in the Spanish Colonial Trade by Marvin T.

Smith, Mary Elizabeth Good. Early Sixteenth Century Glass Beads in the Spanish Colonial Trade: Authors: Marvin T. Smith, Mary Elizabeth Good: Publisher: Cottonlandia Museum Publications, Length: 64 pages: Export Citation: BiBTeX EndNote RefMan.

Beads of Spanish colonial Nueva Cadiz occur only at sites with a pre occupation, and are absent at sites dating to the second half of the sixteenth century (Deagan ). certain types of artifacts are very useful for dating early sixteenth-century site One glass bead.

Despite the considerable amount of research devoted to the study of 16th-century contact between Native Americans and Spaniards in Florida, little attention has been given to the impact of Spanish shipwrecks on the lives and material culture of the Florida Indians.

Spanish land-based expeditions are traditionally presented as the principal means of Author: Mark Allender. OctoColumbus recorded in his logbook the natives of San Salvador Island were given red caps and glass beads.

This is the earliest written record of glass beads in the Americas. The Spanish explorer Hernando Cortéz landed on the coast of Mexico in the spring of His ships carried glass beads along with other European trade goods. The first European explorers and colonists gave Native Americans glass and ceramic beads as gifts and used beads for trade with them.

Native Americans had made bone, shell, and stone beads long before the Europeans arrived in North America, and continued to do so. Get this from a library. Early sixteenth century glass beads in the Spanish colonial trade. [Marvin T Smith; Mary Elizabeth Good].

Under a former Native American village in Georgia, deep inside what's now the U.S., archaeologists say they've found 16th-century jewelry and other Spanish artifacts. The discovery suggests an expedition led by conquistador. Cite this Record. Early Sixteenth Century Glass Beads in the Spanish Colonial Trade.

Marvin T. Smith, Mary E. Good. Greenwood, MS: Cottonlandia Museum Publications. ( Cited by:   3) Beads can tell us about trade and culture.

Shell beads are found at Cahokia, far from their coastal source. Glass beads traveled with the Spanish, British and French to the America and Africa. Beads can help archaeologists uncover how people and objects moved around the world!Author: Outreach Staff. Early Amsterdam trade beads.

A glass bead industry flourished in Amsterdam during most of the 17th century. This article reports on the glass beads and production wasters recovered from four sites near the edge of the old part of the city.

Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Early Sixteenth Century Glass Beads in the Spanish Colonial Trade at Read honest and /5. Seventeenth Century Trade in the Colonial Southeast focusing especially on a new type of trade gun and the glass beads. The goal of the research is to provide an accurate date for the Author: Gregory Waselkov.

"Early Sixteenth Century Glass Beads in the. Spanish Colonial Trade" by Marvin T. Smith. and Mary Elizabeth Good "Beadwork" Shire album 57 by Pamela Clabburn "Bead Embroidery" by Joan Edwards. And, check out various pictures from the mid. fifteenth century. The one I can think of.

off the top of my head (because I just finished. The exchange of exotic valuables was vital for the emergent relationships between European colonists and indigenous peoples during the late 15th and early 16th century Caribbean.

As the colonial presence became more pressing and intercultural dynamics more complex, formerly distinct material worlds increasingly : Floris W.M.

Keehnen. Some 1, people lived in Luna’s 16th-century colony, which is believed to have stretched over what are now multiple blocks of downtown Pensacola.

The university is not revealing the exact location where the artifacts were found, in order to protect the neighborhood and the integrity of the site, Author: Sarah Pruitt.

Start studying US History Test 1 Textbook Questions. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Why didn't England make stronger attempts to colonize the New World before the late sixteenth to early seventeenth century.

a form of trade between the Spanish and natives. Huron-Wendat sites around the Kawartha Lakes show an influx of Saint Lawrence trade in the 16th century, followed by an immigration wave about Huron-Wendat sites near Toronto show an unabated inflow of Native materials from the Saint Lawrence valley; however, neutral sites west of Lake Ontario show Native Cited by: 2.

The history of glass-making dates back to at least 3, BC in Mesopotamia, however some claim they may have been producing copies of glass objects from Egypt.

Other archaeological evidence suggests that the first true glass was made in coastal north Syria, Mesopotamia or Egypt. The earliest known glass objects, of the mid 2, BC, were beads, perhaps initially.

- Early 16th Century Glass Beads in the Spanish Colonial Trade by Mary Elizabeth Good and Marvin Smith - Exotic Czech Beads from the 's by Marie Jose and Howard Opper. cause of its use of "Early Sixteenth Cen-tury Glass Beads in the Spanish Colonial Trade" () by Marvin T.

Smith and Mary Elizabeth Good as the basis of its descrip-tive glass bead typology, a review of that publication is included in our BOOK REVIEW Section. The Smith and Good publication is dedicated "to John Goggin and Charles H. Fairbanks. This thesis examines bead preferences in Peru, Venezuela, and Colombia before and after the Spanish Conquest during the sixteenth century.

By examining the spread of beads across a region, I was able to gain insight into colors and materials that people desired and identify potential patterns of resistance to glass : Kristi May Feinzig.

The Portuguese appearance in Melaka and the Spanish in the Philippines in the early sixteenth century was a consequence of European territorial, economic and religious ambitions in Southeast Asia (Dixon, ).

Both countries were primarily driven by the desire to acquire Southeast Asian spices and other natural and manufactured produceFile Size: KB. For more references read "Early 16th Century glass beads in the early Spanish colonial trade" by Marvin T. Smith, Mary Elizabeth Good and "The History of beads" by Lois Sherr Dubin.

Age: 's to early 's Made in: Amsterdam or Venice, traded with the Native American people of Florida. Made of: Glass. Measurements: 24 mm length x 4 mm width. on the outdated Little chronology for Spanish beads in the southeastern United States, they assign the beads to the 16th century.

I would suggest that they consult 18th-century site reports. Aside from this site, other 16th-century sites in the region produce few, if any, trade goods. The author. Sixteenth-century Spanish artifacts are uncommon but widespread finds in the Southeastern United States, and documented assemblages have been variously used by archaeologists either as secondary indicators of the presence of passing Spanish explorers, or also as evidence of direct or indirect Spanish trade.

Jul 5, - These are images of beautiful antique rosaries that I have collected while browsing the internet through the years. Wish they were mine!. See more ideas about Rosary beads, Beads and Rosary catholic pins.

Start studying Exam One - US History. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search. the schism in Catholicism that began with Martin Luther and John Calvin in the early 16th century.

a Spanish colonial system requiring Indian towns to supply workers for the colonizers. Find the perfect spanish colonial artifact stock photo. Huge collection, amazing choice, + million high quality, affordable RF and RM images.

Spanish colonial book hardware Rosary [16th/17th century 17th century 16th century Spanish spur with original leather Found at. Bradley, James Blue Crystals and Other Trinkets: Glass Beads from Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Century New England.

In Proceedings of the Glass Trade Bead Conference, Charles F. Hayes III, editor, pp. 29– Rochester Museum and Science Center Research Record, No Rochester, by: - Founded in by profoundly lost Englishmen searching for gold.

(SPOILER ALERT: No gold). See more ideas about Colonial america, Jamestown va pins. Two undated and anonymous sixteenth- century manuscript charts on vellum of the west coast of South and Central America are in the VELLUM CHART COLLECTION in the Geography and Map Division.

A second major body of manuscripts relating to the history of Spanish America during its colonial period was donated by Hans P. Kraus in   2. In the early sixteenth century, Spanish conquistadors took control of much of the Americas. The consequences were enormous. Discuss the Spanish conquest in a well organized essay that addresses three of the following: • Explain two reasons for the Spanish desire to establish an empire in the Americas.

- Early Susquehanna, Iroquois Colored Trade Bead Chart, by Gerald B. Fenstermaker - Glass Beads from Europe: with value guide by Sibylle Jargstorf - Holiday Menagerie with Cernit #1 by Donna Kato - Home Sweet Home with Sculpey III by Donna Kato - South American Colored Trade Bead Chart - Spanish Material of the Older Susquehanna Sites.

Daily Life in Spanish St. Augustine Presenters: Laura W., Y., Joan D., Calvin P., R., Cathryn B. Kathy seventeenth century. This image of a Spanish colonial smithy in the Southwest shows City during the mid-sixteenth century, and in Puebla by the mid-seventeenth century.

The products. Chevron beads were common on Spanish colonial sites in the Americas between the early 16th century and the early 17th century, and were especially popular in Mexico and Peru.

Examples reached the Franciscan mission site at Tipu in western Belize, which was occupied from the s into the early 17th century. (shelved 1 time as spanish-colonial-period) avg rating — 5, ratings — published Want to Read saving. The Early Historic Period () on the Upper Coosa Drainage of Alabama and Georgia () Early Historic Period Vestiges of the Southern Cult () Early Sixteenth Century Glass Beads in the Spanish Colonial Trade ().Shop Spanish Colonial decorative objects at 1stdibs, the world's largest source of Spanish Colonial and other authentic period furniture.

Global shipping available.Early Philippine China Trade; or late 14th century to late 16th century AD). By the early sixteen century, the time of European contact, most of the major islands of the Philippines had a.